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Chronology 1990s-Present

Brautigan's work continued to enjoy the favor of a dedicated body of international readers, scholars, and fans throughout the decade of the 1990s and into the present. Several of his books, long out of print, were collected and republished. His last novel, An Unfortunate Woman, was published post-humously, as was a collection of his early writings, The Edna Webster Collection of Undiscovered Writings. More information and resources about Brautigan, his life, and work during these decades are below.
1991
Highlights: Second collection of works published

Front cover The collection A Confederate General from Big Sur, Dreaming of Babylon, The Hawkline Monster published. The front cover photograph by John Fryer of Livingston, Montana, originally appeared on the back cover of The Hawkline Monster.
1995
Highlights: Third collection of works published

Front cover The collection Revenge of The Lawn, The Abortion, So The Wind Won't Blow It All Away published. The front cover photograph by Edmund Shea originally appeared on the front cover of The Abortion.

Front cover The previously unpublished "novel," Would you like to saddle up a couple of goldfish and swim to Alaska?, published. This novel was later included in the Edna Webster Collection of Undiscovered Writings.
Highlights: Edna Webster Collection of Undiscovered Writings published

Front cover The Edna Webster Collection of Undiscovered Writings published. Featured stories and poems written by a young Brautigan and given to Edna Webster, the beloved mother of both his best friend and his first "real" girlfriend. Brautigan seen as hopelessly lovestruck, cheerily goofy, and at his most disarmingly innocent.
Highlights: An Unfortunate Woman published

Front cover An Unfortunate Woman published. Completed during Summer 1982, this novel was published post-humously, first in France in 1994 as Cahier d'un Retour de Troie (Diary of a Return from Troy), then the United States. The theme was an exploration of death through the oblique ruminations on the suicide death of one female friend, and the death by cancer of another.